Japanese live so long


Japan has the oldest life expectancy in the world. Japan is the only nation in the world with the highest average age in the world. Japanese women’s average age is 86 and 79 years for men which is much more than Americans and other nations. What in the world causes Japanese live so long?

Japanese live so long

According to World Health Organization, The Japanese can live 75 of those years disability free and fully healthy.

For the past 25 years Japanese women have held the world record for living the longest, 86.4 years. Not just the women, Japanese men have the longest life expectancy among all men in the world’s 192 nations. Much of this distinction is attributed to eating a healthy diet. Here’s the Japanese recipe for living to a ripe old age, while staying active and healthy.

The Japanese have a different mind set about food. The ingredients simmering in a Japanese kitchen are a simple variety of foods eaten on a consistent and daily basis: Green Tea, Vegetables, Rice, Fish, Soy, and Fruits.


Green Tea is full of antioxidants which are good for fighting cancer, and apparently helps break up oils in the digestive system, keeping those bowels happy.

Japanese breakfast is considered the most important and biggest meal of the day In Japan. It can consist of a variety of small courses which include green tea, steamed rice, miso soup with tofu and scallions, small sheets of nori seaweed, an egg omelet or piece of fish.

Tofu and bean sprouts are awesome for getting you proteins and help reduce heart disease and high blood pressure

In Japan, fish is the primary meat to eat, which means not only do they keep their cholesterol lower, but they also get healthy fish oils. Japanese people don’t eat nearly as much red meat. Red meat has a lot more cholesterol than fish, which causes you in your later years to have a much higher chance for heart disease, heart attack, stroke, and other things. The Japanese eat rice instead of bread with every meal.

The Japanese eat small portions of a variety of courses at a meal. According to Moriyama, from childhood they are taught to eat slowly, savoring every bite.

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